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Plato Grishin
Plato Grishin

Shared Files Folders - 178 Files (2.72 GB)


Attaching a video to an email might be your best option for sending video files to friends and family members who aren't familiar with cloud technology like Dropbox and Google Drive. Those platforms are probably the smoothest way to transport video files without altering their quality.




Shared Files Folders - 178 Files (2.72 GB)


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The JVM will fail to initialize on Linux systems where /proc/self/mountinfo does not contain any mounted filesystem or controllers for cgroups. This failure occurs due to faulty detection logic where it incorrectly detects a cgroup v1 system, having no mounted controllers, as a cgroup v2 system.


This change enforces the unqualified name format checks for NameAndType strings as outlined in the JVM specification sections 4.4.6 and 4.2.2, meaning that some illegal names and descriptors that users may be utilizing in their classfiles will now be caught with a Class Format Error. This includes format checking for all strings under non-referenced NameAndType's. Users will see a change if they (A) are using Java classfile version 6 or below and have an illegal NameAndType descriptor with no Methodref or Fieldref reference to it; or (B) are using any Java classfile version and have an illegal NameAndType name with no Methodref or Fieldref reference to it.


Starting from macOS Catalina 10.15, applications do not have access to the Desktop, Documents and Downloads folders. So, if you use JavaControlPanel app to access files at the locations specified above, (such as load certificates from the Downloads folder) you must either move the files to another location or grant the required permissions to the JavaControlPanel app.


Following the JDK's update to tzdata2020b, the long-obsolete files named pacificnew and systemv have been removed. As a result, the "US/Pacific-New" Zone name declared in the pacificnew data file is no longer available for use.


Caused By: java.lang.SecurityException: The jurisdiction policy files are not signed by the expected signer! (Policy files are specific per major JDK release.Ensure the correct version is installed.) at javax.crypto.JarVerifier.verifyPolicySigned(JarVerifier.java:336) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.loadPolicies(JceSecurity.java:378) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.setupJurisdictionPolicies(JceSecurity.java:323) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.access$000(JceSecurity.java:50) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity$1.run(JceSecurity.java:85) at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.(JceSecurity.java:82)


Two files, jre/bin/javaw.exe and jre/bin/jabswitch.exe, were not included in 8u171. As a workaround, users who need those files can download the non-server JRE and copy those files from it into their server JRE image.


The JDK uses the Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) Jurisdiction Policy files to configure cryptographic algorithm restrictions. Previously, the Policy files in the JDK placed limits on various algorithms. This release ships with both the limited and unlimited jurisdiction policy files, with unlimited being the default. The behavior can be controlled via the new 'crypto.policy' Security property found in the /lib/java.security file. Please refer to that file for more information on this property.


DSA keys less than 1024 bits have been added to the jdk.jar.disabledAlgorithms Security property in the java.security file. This property contains a list of disabled algorithms and key sizes for signed JAR files. If a signed JAR file uses a disabled algorithm or key size less than the minimum length, signature verification operations will ignore the signature and treat the JAR as if it were unsigned. This can potentially occur in the following types of applications that use signed JAR files:


This release introduces a new feature whereby the JCE jurisdiction policy files used by the JDK can be controlled via a new Security property. In older releases, JCE jurisdiction files had to be downloaded and installed separately to allow unlimited cryptography to be used by the JDK. The download and install steps are no longer necessary. To enable unlimited cryptography, one can use the new crypto.policy Security property. If the new Security property (crypto.policy) is set in the java.security file, or has been set dynamically using the Security.setProperty() call before the JCE framework has been initialized, that setting will be honored. By default, the property will be undefined. If the property is undefined and the legacy JCE jurisdiction files don't exist in the legacy lib/security directory, then the default cryptographic level will remain at 'limited'. To configure the JDK to use unlimited cryptography, set the crypto.policy to a value of 'unlimited'. See the notes in the java.security file shipping with this release for more information.


Because the old JCE jurisdiction files are left in /lib/security, they may not meet the latest security JAR signing standards, which were refreshed in 6u131, 7u121, 8u111, and later updates. An exception similar to the following might be seen if the old files are used:


According to the Java VM Specification, final fields can be modified by the putfield byte code instruction only if the instruction appears in the instance initializer method of the field's declaring class. Similar, static final fields can be modified by a putstatic instruction only if the instruction appears in the class initializer method of the field's declaring class. With the JDK 9 release, the HotSpot VM fully enforces the previously mentioned restrictions, but only for class files with version number >= 53. For class files with version numbers


This release introduces a new feature whereby the JCE jurisdiction policy files used by the JDK can be controlled via a new Security property. In older releases, JCE jurisdiction files had to be downloaded and installed separately to allow unlimited cryptography to be used by the JDK. The download and install steps are no longer necessary. To enable unlimited cryptography, one can use the new crypto.policy Security property. If the new Security property (crypto.policy) is set in the java.security file, or has been set dynamically by using the Security.setProperty() call before the JCE framework has been initialized, that setting will be honored. By default, the property will be undefined. If the property is undefined and the legacy JCE jurisdiction files don't exist in the legacy lib/security directory, then the default cryptographic level will remain at 'limited'. To configure the JDK to use unlimited cryptography, set the crypto.policy to a value of 'unlimited'. See the notes in the java.security file shipping with this release for more information.


Caused by: java.lang.SecurityException: Jurisdiction policy files are not signed by trusted signers! at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.loadPolicies(JceSecurity.java:593) at javax.crypto.JceSecurity.setupJurisdictionPolicies(JceSecurity.java:524)


The issue is observed in signed JAR files whose manifest contains package version information[1] and does not have a trailing "/" in the name of the package (e.g.: Name: org/apache/xml/resolver). While we work towards resolving this issue, in the interim, users can work-around the issue as follows:


For example, to restrict SHA1 in JAR files signed after January 1st 2018, add the following to the property: "SHA1 denyAfter 2018-01-01". The syntax is the same as the certpath property, however certificate checking will not be performed by this property.


Use ZFS datasets like any file system after creation.Set other available features on a per-dataset basis when needed.The example below creates a new file system called data.It assumes the file system contains important files and configures it to store two copies of each data block.


Destroy a pool that is no longer needed to reuse the disks.Destroying a pool requires unmounting the file systems in that pool first.If any dataset is in use, the unmount operation fails without destroying the pool.Force the pool destruction with -f.This can cause undefined behavior in applications which had open files on those datasets.


Export pools before moving them to another system.ZFS unmounts all datasets, marking each device as exported but still locked to prevent use by other disks.This allows pools to be imported on other machines, other operating systems that support ZFS, and even different hardware architectures (with some caveats, see zpool(8)).When a dataset has open files, use zpool export -f to force exporting the pool.Use this with caution.The datasets are forcibly unmounted, potentially resulting in unexpected behavior by the applications which had open files on those datasets.


Unlike traditional disks and volume managers, space in ZFS is not preallocated.With traditional file systems, after partitioning and assigning the space, there is no way to add a new file system without adding a new disk.With ZFS, creating new file systems is possible at any time.Each dataset has properties including features like compression, deduplication, caching, and quotas, as well as other useful properties like readonly, case sensitivity, network file sharing, and a mount point.Nesting datasets within each other is possible and child datasets will inherit properties from their ancestors.Delegate, replicate, snapshot, jail allows administering and destroying each dataset as a unit.Creating a separate dataset for each different type or set of files has advantages.The drawbacks to having a large number of datasets are that some commands like zfs list will be slower, and that mounting of hundreds or even thousands of datasets will slow the FreeBSD boot process. 041b061a72


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